Operant Conditioning

What is Operant Conditioning?

Operant Conditioning is a method of learning that modifies behaviour through rewards and punishments. It focuses on the idea that an individual's behaviour can be changed based on the consequences or responses it receives. Behaviour can vary in form, frequency, and strength.

Operant vs Classical Conditioning

It aims to modify voluntary behaviours that can be maintained by consequences or responses.

It deals with automatic or reflexive behaviours that are not influenced by consequences.

Operant   Conditioning

Classical  Conditioning

Types of Operants/Responses to a Behaviour

Skinner identified three types of operants that can follow behaviour: 1. Neutral operants: Responses from the environment that neither increase nor decrease the probability of a behaviour being repeated.  2. Reinforcement: Consequences that strengthen behaviour, which can be positive (adding something favorable) or negative (removing something unfavorable).

Types of Operants/Responses to a Behaviour

3. Punishment: Consequences that weaken behaviour, which can be positive (adding something unfavorable) or negative (removing something favorable).

Core Tools of  Operant Conditioning

The core tools of operant conditioning include: 1. Positive Reinforcement: Presenting favorable events or outcomes after a behaviour to strengthen it. 2. Negative Reinforcement: Removing unfavorable events or outcomes after a behaviour to strengthen it.

Core Tools of  Operant Conditioning

3. Positive Punishment: Imposing unfavorable consequences after a behaviour to decrease it. 4. Negative Punishment: Removing favorable events or outcomes after a behaviour to decrease it.

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